Tolkien essay on beowulf


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His On Fairy tales I have lauded elsewhere, was it appears also i An extraordinary collection of Tolkien essays from the s to s. The essays on English and Welsh and A Secret Vice were enjoyable and informative, though the latter and the closing Valedictory Address strike me as filler. A very good, if difficult read. May 06, ika rated it it was amazing Shelves: on-the-shelf , non-fiction. Not only was he a great author, but also a very influential scholar. His most famous essay, The Monsters and the Critics changed completely the way of approaching Beowulf as a work of art, and not only an archeological finding that may shed some light on the historical mysteries.

Classics Summarized: Beowulf

All in all, it was a great read. I recommend it to anyone who is at least a tiny bit interested in early-medieval literature or fantasy. Apr 20, Tommy Grooms rated it it was amazing. This collection is an absolute staple to appreciating the creator of Middle-earth.

Jul 06, Haplila rated it it was amazing. I already loved LOTR, and this book made me love that series even more. My favorite essay out of the collection was "On Fairy Stories. You'll walk away from it with a new appreciation for the significance of stories in our lives. May 07, Lucinda rated it it was amazing Shelves: university , j-r-r-tolkien. View all 5 comments. Jul 13, Eustacia Tan rated it it was amazing Shelves: non-fiction , nlb-ereads.

It's a good thing that this is a book of essays because it's easy to read about one a day although it's not a light read. The essays are: Beowulf: The Monsters and the Critics: I realised how rusty the 'literature' part of my brain was because this was difficult for me and it's not aimed at a scholarly audience! On Translating Beowulf: see comments above Sir Gawain and the It's a good thing that this is a book of essays because it's easy to read about one a day although it's not a light read.

On Translating Beowulf: see comments above Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: this was interesting and didn't feel as hard - perhaps because I have some knowledge of Arthurian legends? On Fairy Stories: love, love, loved this! Valedictory Address to the University of Oxford: on his department and even though he claims to be a poor lecturer, I wish I had the chance to attend one of his lectures based on the essays here The essays here, while not scholarly, are definitely not as easy as a TED talk.

They take work while reading, but the effort is definitely worth it. And by the way, I have tons of saved quotes from On Fairy Stories, like: "Faerie is a perilous land, and in it are pitfalls for the unwary and dungeons for the overbold. But too many quotes and I would probably just end up transcribing the entire essay. I'm not going to say that all Tolkien fans should read this because it's not really aimed at them I think. But if you're interested in mythology or philology, this is for you.

And if you're a fan of Chesterton, or just a fan of fairy stories, On Fairy Stories is definitely a must-read. This review was first posted at Inside the mind of a Bibliophile Jan 03, Michael Arnold rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction. This is an excellent collection of essays, with some really great pieces I will be reading again. I really do love Tolkien's non-Middle Earth stuff, it's a shame it doesn't get more attention, because it absolutely deserves it. Through Tolkien's mastery of ancient languages, and poetry of the medieval age like Beowulf which gets two essays here dedicated to it and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Tolkien offers insights that few others can in such an engaging way.

But it's his love of language This is an excellent collection of essays, with some really great pieces I will be reading again. But it's his love of languages that makes this collection so enjoyable, the only reason to be drawn back a little from this book is that it does not contain the complete text of A Secret Vice.

Still a great essay in itself, really interesting for people interested in building languages, but still - there's more to this essay out there. I read this in Icelandic. Tolkien actually never came to Iceland but despite that he did have the ability to read Icelandic fluently. Jun 15, Nicholas Whyte rated it really liked it Shelves: xc , sf , non-fiction , tolkien , , about , As always, they are an interesting insight into how his mind worked, or at least how he wanted us to think it worked. The more academic pieces in particular the second, "On Translating Beowulf" are somewhat moored in academic controversies of their time, which may or may not have subsided by now and which in any case I am not close to.

But the title piece rises above that to give an argument for appreciating Beowulf as a real story with serious monsters, rather than just a source for scholarly discussion on vaguely related topics, and that is the point made in the vivid metaphor of the man who built his tower on inherited land. The other highlight for me, even as a non-Welsh speaker, is the lecture "English and Welsh" urging those with an interest in the history of the English language not to ignore its nearest geographical neighbour.

So there may well be something to it. His valedictory address, at the end of the book, is an amusing but somewhat rambling justification for wandering off the point for most of his career, but in fact a commitment to an aesthetic of narrative seems to have been precisely the point, one which he successfully communicated through both his fiction and his non-fiction. I enjoyed the last three essays in this book much more than the first few.

Beowulf and The Lord of the Rings Essay -- anglo-saxon period, medieval

Tolkien's analyses and arguments for his value of Beowulf and Sir Gawain came off to me pedantic and overly intellectual. His passion was clear, but I didn't find the narrow topics interesting enough for a general readership. These essays would make sense as reading assignments in an English graduate-level course, but I couldn't get into them just for fun.

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The last few essays were much more interesting to me. I enjoyed th I enjoyed the last three essays in this book much more than the first few. I enjoyed the historical linguistics that Tolkien employed to discuss Welsh and English, and the confession of his "Secret Vice" of creating languages was entertaining. I also thoroughly appreciated his discussion of "Lang" and "Lit" in the last essay. I recommend this book as a whole to fans of Tolkien only. If you enjoy languages and bureaucratic debates within collegiate institutions, I recommend the last few essays.

Overall, a satisfying read for someone who misses being in a classroom. It keeps my mind sharp, at the very least! Plus, I love Tolkien, no matter what. I'm a fan. Jun 21, Melora rated it really liked it. Those did Not disappoint, and "On Fairy-Stories" was also very good I'd read it before, but it had been a while! With the other essays in this collection, there was always Some interesting stuff, but also a fair lot that was either beyond my understanding especially the case with "On Translating Beowulf," although, having just read Tolkien's newly released Beowulf, I picked this for the title essay, "Beowulf: The Monsters and the Critics," and also the one on Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

With the other essays in this collection, there was always Some interesting stuff, but also a fair lot that was either beyond my understanding especially the case with "On Translating Beowulf," although, having just read Tolkien's newly released Beowulf, I really did enjoy this one or simply not of much interest to me particularly the "Valedictory Address". Still, the good definitely outweighed the uninteresting here -- those top three essays are excellent. Jun 30, Gretchen rated it it was amazing Shelves: historical.

Tolkien is brilliantly insightful on a level that few achieve. His knowledge of language and literature shines in these essays. The five star rating is for a literary scholar. For a fan only of Tolkien's fiction, this may or may not be interesting. But for anyone interested in Anglo Saxon or medieval lit, or in linguistic distinctions, this book is a treasure.

Essays include an analysis of Beowulf as a poem, Gawain, the process of creating languages, and drawing distinctions within the disciplin Tolkien is brilliantly insightful on a level that few achieve.


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Essays include an analysis of Beowulf as a poem, Gawain, the process of creating languages, and drawing distinctions within the discipline of literature. If anyone ever wanted to know where Tolkien got his ideas for his fantasy, this is a glimpse into his genius. Quite possibly the best literary essay ever published.

Here, the author of the Lord of the Rings takes aim at scholars who would dismiss the literary merit of the greatest poem published between the fall of Rome and the Thirteenth Century because dear me! It is a wonderful if at times dense reflection on the importance of such supernatural elements in heroic tales. Could be read in tandem with Matt Kaplan's most excellent Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite Quite possibly the best literary essay ever published.

Could be read in tandem with Matt Kaplan's most excellent Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite -- on the science of monsters. Jan 24, Phillip rated it it was amazing. Tolkien's "The Monsters and the Critics" was a speech he gave when he received one of his academic chairs.

The speech single highhandedly revived the discipline of Anglo Saxon studies from a dying thing to something we are still studying. This speech presents one of the few times the author used allegory. As of yesterday I am a proud owner of this boxed set! Thank you local charity shop. It is a wonderful collection of his shorter, lighter tales.

Whilst still having lots of depth. Tree and leaf is particularly wonderful. View 1 comment. Feb 06, Eadweard rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction , non-fiction-read , mythology , fairy-tales-folklore , essays , j-r-r-tolkien. Fantastic essays, Tolkien's love for languages and myths permeates through all of them.

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I specially liked "Welsh and English". May 03, Cyr rated it really liked it. This inclusion of "On Fairy-Stories" alone makes this collection worth having. That essay, with its unfortunate and uninspiring title, changed my life. I had always felt vaguely guilty that I was so drawn to fantasy literature, feeling almost that I was "cheating on reality", that I should be more in love with the real world than any fictional one. This is even more true when one is a Christian. I know Christians who feel a book is nonsense and unprofitable if it has "unrealistic" elements, occurrences that they would not believe possible to happen in actual life.

I'm not sure how they square that sentiment with a reverence of the Christian Bible, which of course contains giants and giant-killers, references to fantastic beasts, a Dragon, talking animals, miracles, ghosts, sorcery, visions of another world hidden from everyday view, and resurrection of the dead. As Tolkien points out, the story of humanity is the story of the supernatural piercing and penetrating the merely natural world and infusing it with meaning; the most shocking and significant event in the history of the universe, the descent of the eternal One, the Creator-Of-Everything down into creation as a lowly fleshly creature, was the most supernatural event of all.

What can one call the Bible if not a Fairy-Tale? It has been dismissed as such by atheists and skeptics for centuries, but they're right - only the point is not that fairy-tales as such are false, stories of "things that can't and have never happened", but that fairy-tales are infinitely more true than stories in which the natural world is the only world, and "reality" is limited to the sort of everyday occurrences that we generally observe, that our lives mostly consist of.

I shouldn't wholly neglect to mention "The Monsters and the Critics", an essay that is essential reading if you've ever read Beowulf, heard it lectured upon or spoken of in academic circles, or had contact with it any form. This review only covers the edition, which contained only this one lecture. It was given by an academic, to academics - have your facing-page translation of the poem handy, unless you already read Old English; also have your Latin dictionary and classical mythology references standing by. This is the original lecture that Tolkien gave to the British Academy about the effect of Beowulf on English literature through history, but especially in the 19th Century.

His main focus is on how the cri This review only covers the edition, which contained only this one lecture. His main focus is on how the critics never seemed to look at Beowulf as a poem; instead focusing on whether it was historical or mythical, pagan or Christian. He analyses the poem as a poem, and why the poet was successful at his craft. He points out quite a bit of stuff previous critics have overlooked in their various analyses, and calls them out on it, especially their attitude towards the mythological elements - the monsters.

There are Tolkien's notes at the end of the lecture, about various references and previous to editions of the poem. This lecture became an enormous influence on future editions and translations of Beowulf, and is still a great influence on scholarship of the poem to this day - Google "impact of Beowulf: the Monsters and the Critics" to see what I mean, if you're curious. Be prepared to read all day. Or you could read a more recent addition that has the translations included. But it was fun to read the original transcript published by the Oxford University Press.

I enjoyed reading it, but it's dense enough that it took a while to get all the way through a mere 53 pages. I also enjoyed his excursions into humor, of the dry academic sort, but they made me chuckle. Oct 13, Justin Wiggins rated it it was amazing. This essay compilation, edited by Tolkien's son Christopher Tolkien, was challenging, inspiring, and profoundly moving.

I still remember the night I purchased my copy of this from Blackwell's bookshop in Oxford, England. My favorite essay they are all good in their own right is Tolkien's essay on fairy stories he gave as a lecture at St. Andrew' in Scotland in It is a powerful philosophical work that explores the phenomenon of human consciousness, myth, storytelling, and religion.

This book brings back some good memories of reading from it at The Eagle and Child pub in Oxford, England where Tolkien, Lewis, Charles Williams, Owen Barfield, Hugo Dyson, Warnie Lewis, and the other Inklings would get together to talk nonsense, literature, theology, and life experience over beer, tea, cider, and pipes.

Jul 15, Kim rated it really liked it Shelves: books-i-own. A fascinating, if dense and academic look at several topics related to the relationship between language and literature. Of particular interest to me was 'On Fairy Stories', which is a passionate defense of fantasy and fairy stories. There are so many 'serious literary writers' who are dismissive of genre fiction, as though literary fiction has a corner on describing the human condition.

As an Oxford don, Tolkien was uniquely situated to defend fairy stories clearly and with examples of fairy st A fascinating, if dense and academic look at several topics related to the relationship between language and literature. As an Oxford don, Tolkien was uniquely situated to defend fairy stories clearly and with examples of fairy stories and their impact on people and literature across the centuries.

Dec 20, Jack rated it liked it. Of the works in this volume, the title essay is a trenchant and important piece of literary criticism, and "On Fairy-Stories" is quite intriguing, at the very least for its bold closing contention that the Passion is the ultimate expression of the fairy-story as Tolkien defines it. The other essays are fairly ramb 3. The other essays are fairly rambling and I expect they will only be of particular interest to their specific disciplines.

Sep 05, Max Eichelberger rated it liked it. I started this book early this year perhaps even February.

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After reading about Beowulf I put it down. I picked it up again and again when I needed a quick entertainment. I finished the last essay on a sleepy day in September at my desk in the office. In Beowulf and the Critics Tolkien's complex and convoluted argument is made more straightforwardly than it is in the published essay.

Many of the veiled literary references and allegorical allusions of "The Monsters and the Critics" are here spelled out, and Tolkien also provides a capsule history of Beowulf-criticism from the re-discovery of the poem until the '30's. Readers can see what Tolkien really thought about previous Beowulf critics but was too circumspect to publish, and they can also follow the development of Tolkien's thought about Beowulf from rather inchoate impressions to the logical and rhetorical brilliance of the published lecture.

Beowulf and the Critics is of interest not only to Anglo-Saxonists, but to scholars of Tolkien's work and general readers.

http://exisaludsas.com/includes/doesandroid/rastrear-numero-de-telefone-celular-online.html Those interested in Tolkien's fictional works will find intriguing hints about Tolkien's method of composition and see how even before or immediately after the composition of The Hobbit Tolkien was using his fiction and poetry in his scholarship and his scholarship in his fiction and poetry.

Lewis poem about a dragon The many layers of writing and revision which are documented in the textual notes provide a window into Tolkien's method of composition, which includes many intriguing false starts and changes of direction. The explanatory notes collect together all the sources Tolkien used for his work and detail the influences that shaped his critical understanding. Beowulf and the Critics is therefore valuable not only in its intrinsic sense as part of literary history, but also as an illustration of the development of the thought of one of the most influential authors and scholars of the twentieth century.

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